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  1. bradleyj's Avatar
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       #1  
    My Thoughts on WP7 (keep in mind I am coming from webOS)

    POSITIVES:

    Unified Standards
    I won’t go into all the benefits, but as a consumer, I am glad that there is consistency between Windows Phones. It is a lot of work to switch platforms, and I wouldn’t relish the idea of that same stress in simply moving between devices as could be the case with Android.

    Beautiful Interface
    Aesthetically, Windows Phone looks great; I think it is the best. I have a feeling the black borders are easier on the eyes. The general UI of swiping left/right through different categories of info is awesome. For example in the email, swiping seamlessly between “all,” “unread,” and “flagged” is much better than finding and carefully tapping buttons (or worse going through menus). Multitasking is no webOS, but I like seeing the whole app more than iOS’s little icons so I am satisfied with the Mango multitasking UI.

    Built in functionality
    Out of the box, Windows Phone has a ton of functionality that other platforms would require numerous apps to replicate. Integration with Windows Live services, Google accounts, Facebook, twitter etc. is great. No “Google sync” apps needed here (much like Webos). Also Bing has the functionality of many apps, with built in Vision (for identifying products of translating text), Local Scout (which finds restaurants, local events, shopping etc. and provides maps, contact info and reviews), and a musical search (like Shazaam). MS Office probably deserves its own heading, but integration of that is another example of how well Windows Phone can stand on its own feet.

    Apps
    Apps are not as crucial on Windows Phone, but there are tons of them and many of the big names. Apps are a personal thing, but I can get several good Bible apps, the Overdrive Media console (for downloading audio/ebooks from my library) and other handy little apps such as kids’ games. Also, it is great that most apps seem to have “free trials” even if there isn’t a free-version of the app. I am impressed and content with the Windows Phone App Marketplace.

    Virtual Keyboard
    I give the virtual keyboard on Windows Phone two thumbs up. I often type in portrait mode even! The accuracy is great (I understand it dynamically predicts the key you will press and enlarges the input area), the autocorrect is good and the suggestions are helpful (after one letter it often suggests the right word). I can’t compare too much to iOS or Android, but with my limited experience with them I am certainly pleased with the Windows Phone keyboard.

    Dedicated Buttons
    This may sound funny given my love for webOS, but I think dedicated buttons are very useful on a phone. Having a camera button, back button, search button is very helpful. The camera button is especially nice for capturing spontaneous moments (it can take the phone straight to the camera from being locked). I do wish there were a mute switch though!

    Hardware Variety:
    I have a Samsung Focus with a large beautiful screen wrapped in a light sleek body which in my opinion is much nicer on the hands than the heavy, cold, sharp edged iPhone 4/4s. I would prefer physical buttons (despite the beauty of capacitive buttons) and coming from a Palm Pixi I really miss a keyboard, but that is actually a positive for Windows Phone! That is because there is hardware choice. Physical or capacitive buttons, keyboard or not, smaller or larger you have a better shot at getting the combination you prefer.

    Voice Control:
    I admit that I am very attracted to Siri. I longed for voice controls in webOS and was never satisfied. However, the voice control is quite sufficient in Windows Phone. It may not be Siri, but WP7.5 speech commands even have a few advantages: non-dictation commands can operate without a data connection (i.e. calling someone or opening an app), it can open apps, it automatically reads you back your text message before asking you if you want to send, it can automatically read you incoming messages (both useful when driving), you can indicate you want to call “on speakerphone,” and compared to Siri, Windows Phone’s voice control is more to the point (Siri is a little verbose which I am sure becomes tedious after the first few days).

    Miscellaneous:
    I know there are surely other neat things about Windows Phone. For example you can create contact groups and email/text the whole group easily at once. For business users the ability to send an “I’m running late” notice to all the attendees of an even in the calendar with a tap could be useful (not so much to me). However, I won’t belabor this section because I don’t have enough experience with Windows Phone to know and because I am sure every platform has little benefits unknown to most of their users.

    NEGATIVES:

    Not enough tiles on the start screen:
    There is only room for 8 visible tiles (max) on the start screen without scrolling to see more. By comparison, iOS fits 16 icons plus 4 on the bottom. Now to be fair, WP7 needs less apps accessible because the tiles often integrate the functionality of several apps (i.e. people) and the Bing button integrates the function of many apps as well (see positives above). Still, I wonder why MS wasted so much space on the start screen with the large black strip on the right side, some on the left and some on the top.

    There is little point in me making suggestions, but I would encourage MS to adopt a ‘collage’ approach (see attached image) to tiles in which they take different sizes such as rectangles, big squares and small squares, perhaps with a smart algorithm which fits your tiles together in the most optimum way based on the tiles you want visible on the start screen as well as the kind of info they might display. In any case tiles which display no info should be small, (like icons) so there is room for more tiles. An email tile could be short and wide to offer preview text of the last email. Photos/people could be big and square…you get the idea.

    Tiles are slow to give information/No notification area:
    Tiles are supposed to be able to give more info than an icon. Well, they do…but informative tiles (like accuweather) need to flip over to give you other information and waiting for a tile to flip defeats the purpose of ‘glance and go’. For this reason they are a poor substitute for a notification area.
    Maybe if the tiles flipped faster it would work better (or if they flipped within 2 seconds of being ‘visible’ on the screen)

    No universal search:
    Oh how I long for Just-type from webos. I could pull up a contact or call/text someone by simply typing in the first few letters of their name and clicking the appropriate action (i.e. type “jim” and click “call Jim mobile 403…”). Now these phones lack a keyboard, though this isn’t strictly a flaw of WP7 since there is the Dell Venue Pro for example. Still, iOS has a universal search which makes finding contacts and apps easier. The lack of universal search makes calling someone somewhat complicated.
    If I want to call someone on WP7 I must use the following steps:
    1. Push power button
    2. Swipe up lock screen
    3. Tap on “People”
    a. Swipe to “all” if not already there (it remembers where you were last)
    4. Tap search
    5. Type name “jim”
    6. Click “Jim Jones”
    7. Click appropriate phone number “call mobile”
    Compare webOS:
    1. Push power button
    2. Swipe unlock gesture
    3. Type name “jim”
    a. Click the appropriate “jim” if more than one
    4. Click appropriate phone number
    Compare ios
    1. Push button
    2. Swipe to unlock
    3. Swipe left to spotlight search
    a. Click the “x” to clear last search to get a blank search box if necessary (seems to remember last search sometimes which is silly)
    4. Type name “jim”
    5. Click on “Jim Jones”
    6. Click on the appropriate number “call mobile”
    Again, if MS would simply program the search button to bring up a universal search which would then return options including a “Phone” heading in addition to the Images/Web/Local etc. headings then it would be far more useful.

    Limited and Difficult Homebrew:
    I know now how good I had things with WebOS’s homebrew community. It took an enormous amount of work and stress to unlock my Rogers Focus so that I could enable the Internet Sharing/tethering (I should give Windows Phone another negative for the fact that I had to do this…Rogers encourages tethering and the Focus HAS it built in so I can only blame Microsoft). This may get better now that Chevron is releasing a new unlocking tool and hopefully they will emulate some of what the webOS community did. With zero Linux/programming ability I had patches and homebrew apps on my Palm Pixi in no time and could add more as easily as opening the Preware App.

    Miscellaneous:
    I won’t belabour this, but it is quite frustration to have to navigate into a “settings” app at the bottom of the long list simply to turn wifi on or off when there are indicators when you tap at the top of the screen. Those should be interactive and take you to you cell or wifi settings (or let you deal with them right there). By the way, I know you can add shortcuts to the start screen, and I do have one for wifi…but that shouldn’t be necessary especially given how precious the tile real-estate is.
    Another issue is that the phone-app opens to ‘history’ instead of the dialpad which seems odd. Additionally, there is no ‘search’ within the phone app to search for phone numbers, you are just deflected to the “people” hub to find contact numbers. On webos, when searching in the phone rather than in contacts, only contacts with numbers show up which can be nice when many contacts (especially Facebook) lack numbers.
    Finally, I was disappointed to realize that there is no mute switch on Windows Phones. I thought every phone had a mute switch! I don’t know about android, but I webOS, backberry, and even minimalist iPhone all have physical mute switches. That is handy when you want to mute and unmute your phone on the fly or even in your pocket.


    CONCLUSION:

    There are many positives for Windows Phone as I listed above. It is fast and responsive, beautiful, and full of useful features. However, in my opinion a few of the negatives such as the way notifications are done, the limited number of tiles visible, and the lack of universal search are significant because they strike at the day-to-day usefulness of the phone. It is also unfortunate that the negatives are aspects of the very things which make Windows Phone so great (for example the UI). Nevertheless, I think Windows Phone could retain its unique beauty if it made the simple changes I mentioned (‘collage’ start-screen, Bing universal search, refining the notification/flipping properties of the tiles or adding a notification area).
    If I sound a little disappointed, I admit I am a little. But that isn’t necessarily because iOS or Android are better, I’m fairly sure the latter isn’t and I am sure I would have frustrations with iOS. I think I am now realizing how useful the features of webOS really were. For example, I always wondered why they advertised a little thing like 'Just Type' so much…now I know. But back to Windows Phone, although I am a little frustrated by the number of steps required to say, make a call and by the underwhelming usefulness of live-tiles, I am glad that it has sync/integration, a great virtual keyboard, lots of apps, the metro UI, and I believe it has momentum and an innovative future.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails collagestartscreen.png  
  2. fifthGear's Avatar
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    #2  
    To call Jim, you could more simply hold the search hardware button and when TellMe beeps say "Call Jim".

    Going in via People to make a call is too tedious.
    11B1P likes this.
  3. bradleyj's Avatar
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       #3  
    Good point. I left out using voice to make a call because many people do not do that and in some situations people might not feel comfortable loudly speaking to their phones and letting others know who they are calling...but actually it is the fastest and easiest way (the same is true on the iPhone). I love that in Mango you can say "Call jim jones mobile on speakerphone" and it will do just that.
  4. power5's Avatar
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    #4  
    I like your collage example. I would just make 3 sizes though and be happy. A 1 wide, 2 wide and 3 wide tiles. All same height since I am not sure what you could really do with that 3 wide 1/3 size you have in the picture.. That would give you the option to have 12 tiles on start screen showing. More than enough if you ask me, especially given the deeper integration of social apps than most OS.
  5. bradleyj's Avatar
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       #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by power5 View Post
    I like your collage example. I would just make 3 sizes though and be happy. A 1 wide, 2 wide and 3 wide tiles. All same height since I am not sure what you could really do with that 3 wide 1/3 size you have in the picture.. That would give you the option to have 12 tiles on start screen showing. More than enough if you ask me, especially given the deeper integration of social apps than most OS.
    now how do we get microsoft to add more tile sizes? Anybody here work for the windows phone team?
  6. cckgz4's Avatar
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    #6  
    Have you tried making group hubs for your contacts? Very convenient
    Nokia Lumia 1020 owner here...

  7. enahs555's Avatar
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    #7  
    When you go to the people hub (no matter what screen you are at) and hit the hardware search button, you immediately start searching people....


    At least that is how it is in my still Focus 1.4 NoDo.
  8. red grenadine's Avatar
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    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by enahs555 View Post
    When you go to the people hub (no matter what screen you are at) and hit the hardware search button, you immediately start searching people....


    At least that is how it is in my still Focus 1.4 NoDo.
    Changed in Mango. Search button is always Bing
  9. enahs555's Avatar
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    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by red grenadine View Post
    Changed in Mango. Search button is always Bing

    There is not some other way then of easily searching the contacts? Maybe it is hidden somewhere.
  10. red grenadine's Avatar
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    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by enahs555 View Post
    There is not some other way then of easily searching the contacts? Maybe it is hidden somewhere.
    There's a soft key button for search now.

    I usually just hit the letter "A" to bring up the alphabetical selection menu and go from there
  11. LA6507a's Avatar
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    #11  
    Great review and observations, Bradleyj. I have noticed many of the same things as I have transitioned from webOS to WP7 as well. I am VERY glad to be but I so sincerely miss the convenience of webOS in so many different areas. I am using a Samsung Focus 1.4 so I don't have Mango yet, but I am very pleased with WP7 and, like you, see the awesome potential that our new beloved OS has. I am a heavy BT user and look forward to trying the enhanced voice command integration in Mango.

    Sent from my SGH-i917. using Board Express
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by bradleyj View Post
    Not enough tiles on the start screen:
    There is only room for 8 visible tiles (max) on the start screen without scrolling to see more. By comparison, iOS fits 16 icons plus 4 on the bottom.
    Could not agree more. I don't understand the wasted space around the tiles, either. If they could just get rid of that and lose the arrow (is the arrow really necessary??), and maybe make the tiles just a tad smaller, the tiles could possibly go 3 across instead of only 2. This would of course make them smaller vertically, as well, possibly giving us 15 (if not 18) tiles on the screen without scrolling.

    God, I hate that arrow.

    Excellent review, though. :)
  13. red grenadine's Avatar
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    #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Mazzenga View Post
    Could not agree more. I don't understand the wasted space around the tiles, either. If they could just get rid of that and lose the arrow (is the arrow really necessary??), and maybe make the tiles just a tad smaller, the tiles could possibly go 3 across instead of only 2. This would of course make them smaller vertically, as well, possibly giving us 15 (if not 18) tiles on the screen without scrolling.

    God, I hate that arrow.

    Excellent review, though. :)
    Why the Windows Phone 7 Start Page Has Blank Spots
  14. power5's Avatar
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    #14  
    ^^^ All makes sense to me. I do not want tiles from edge to edge of my screen. I am just fine with the negative space because it does add interest just as that article states. I hate photos with people right in the middle and do my best to use the rule of thirds. Being in design I guess its more second nature to me at this point though.
  15. jkimrey's Avatar
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    #15  
    Bradley,

    That's a thorough, thoughtful, and all around awesome review.

    Hopefully MS will continue to listen to individuals such as yourself and continue to improve the OS!

    Thanks for posting your thoughts.
  16. based_graham's Avatar
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    #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by bradleyj View Post
    My Thoughts on WP7 (keep in mind I am coming from webOS)

    POSITIVES:

    Unified Standards
    I wont go into all the benefits, but as a consumer, I am glad that there is consistency between Windows Phones. It is a lot of work to switch platforms, and I wouldnt relish the idea of that same stress in simply moving between devices as could be the case with Android.

    Beautiful Interface
    Aesthetically, Windows Phone looks great; I think it is the best. I have a feeling the black borders are easier on the eyes. The general UI of swiping left/right through different categories of info is awesome. For example in the email, swiping seamlessly between all, unread, and flagged is much better than finding and carefully tapping buttons (or worse going through menus). Multitasking is no webOS, but I like seeing the whole app more than iOSs little icons so I am satisfied with the Mango multitasking UI.

    Built in functionality
    Out of the box, Windows Phone has a ton of functionality that other platforms would require numerous apps to replicate. Integration with Windows Live services, Google accounts, Facebook, twitter etc. is great. No Google sync apps needed here (much like Webos). Also Bing has the functionality of many apps, with built in Vision (for identifying products of translating text), Local Scout (which finds restaurants, local events, shopping etc. and provides maps, contact info and reviews), and a musical search (like Shazaam). MS Office probably deserves its own heading, but integration of that is another example of how well Windows Phone can stand on its own feet.

    Apps
    Apps are not as crucial on Windows Phone, but there are tons of them and many of the big names. Apps are a personal thing, but I can get several good Bible apps, the Overdrive Media console (for downloading audio/ebooks from my library) and other handy little apps such as kids games. Also, it is great that most apps seem to have free trials even if there isnt a free-version of the app. I am impressed and content with the Windows Phone App Marketplace.

    Virtual Keyboard
    I give the virtual keyboard on Windows Phone two thumbs up. I often type in portrait mode even! The accuracy is great (I understand it dynamically predicts the key you will press and enlarges the input area), the autocorrect is good and the suggestions are helpful (after one letter it often suggests the right word). I cant compare too much to iOS or Android, but with my limited experience with them I am certainly pleased with the Windows Phone keyboard.

    Dedicated Buttons
    This may sound funny given my love for webOS, but I think dedicated buttons are very useful on a phone. Having a camera button, back button, search button is very helpful. The camera button is especially nice for capturing spontaneous moments (it can take the phone straight to the camera from being locked). I do wish there were a mute switch though!

    Hardware Variety:
    I have a Samsung Focus with a large beautiful screen wrapped in a light sleek body which in my opinion is much nicer on the hands than the heavy, cold, sharp edged iPhone 4/4s. I would prefer physical buttons (despite the beauty of capacitive buttons) and coming from a Palm Pixi I really miss a keyboard, but that is actually a positive for Windows Phone! That is because there is hardware choice. Physical or capacitive buttons, keyboard or not, smaller or larger you have a better shot at getting the combination you prefer.

    Voice Control:
    I admit that I am very attracted to Siri. I longed for voice controls in webOS and was never satisfied. However, the voice control is quite sufficient in Windows Phone. It may not be Siri, but WP7.5 speech commands even have a few advantages: non-dictation commands can operate without a data connection (i.e. calling someone or opening an app), it can open apps, it automatically reads you back your text message before asking you if you want to send, it can automatically read you incoming messages (both useful when driving), you can indicate you want to call on speakerphone, and compared to Siri, Windows Phones voice control is more to the point (Siri is a little verbose which I am sure becomes tedious after the first few days).

    Miscellaneous:
    I know there are surely other neat things about Windows Phone. For example you can create contact groups and email/text the whole group easily at once. For business users the ability to send an Im running late notice to all the attendees of an even in the calendar with a tap could be useful (not so much to me). However, I wont belabor this section because I dont have enough experience with Windows Phone to know and because I am sure every platform has little benefits unknown to most of their users.

    NEGATIVES:

    Not enough tiles on the start screen:
    There is only room for 8 visible tiles (max) on the start screen without scrolling to see more. By comparison, iOS fits 16 icons plus 4 on the bottom. Now to be fair, WP7 needs less apps accessible because the tiles often integrate the functionality of several apps (i.e. people) and the Bing button integrates the function of many apps as well (see positives above). Still, I wonder why MS wasted so much space on the start screen with the large black strip on the right side, some on the left and some on the top.

    There is little point in me making suggestions, but I would encourage MS to adopt a collage approach (see attached image) to tiles in which they take different sizes such as rectangles, big squares and small squares, perhaps with a smart algorithm which fits your tiles together in the most optimum way based on the tiles you want visible on the start screen as well as the kind of info they might display. In any case tiles which display no info should be small, (like icons) so there is room for more tiles. An email tile could be short and wide to offer preview text of the last email. Photos/people could be big and squareyou get the idea.

    Tiles are slow to give information/No notification area:
    Tiles are supposed to be able to give more info than an icon. Well, they dobut informative tiles (like accuweather) need to flip over to give you other information and waiting for a tile to flip defeats the purpose of glance and go. For this reason they are a poor substitute for a notification area.
    Maybe if the tiles flipped faster it would work better (or if they flipped within 2 seconds of being visible on the screen)

    No universal search:
    Oh how I long for Just-type from webos. I could pull up a contact or call/text someone by simply typing in the first few letters of their name and clicking the appropriate action (i.e. type jim and click call Jim mobile 403). Now these phones lack a keyboard, though this isnt strictly a flaw of WP7 since there is the Dell Venue Pro for example. Still, iOS has a universal search which makes finding contacts and apps easier. The lack of universal search makes calling someone somewhat complicated.
    If I want to call someone on WP7 I must use the following steps:
    1. Push power button
    2. Swipe up lock screen
    3. Tap on People
    a. Swipe to all if not already there (it remembers where you were last)
    4. Tap search
    5. Type name jim
    6. Click Jim Jones
    7. Click appropriate phone number call mobile
    Compare webOS:
    1. Push power button
    2. Swipe unlock gesture
    3. Type name jim
    a. Click the appropriate jim if more than one
    4. Click appropriate phone number
    Compare ios
    1. Push button
    2. Swipe to unlock
    3. Swipe left to spotlight search
    a. Click the x to clear last search to get a blank search box if necessary (seems to remember last search sometimes which is silly)
    4. Type name jim
    5. Click on Jim Jones
    6. Click on the appropriate number call mobile
    Again, if MS would simply program the search button to bring up a universal search which would then return options including a Phone heading in addition to the Images/Web/Local etc. headings then it would be far more useful.

    Limited and Difficult Homebrew:
    I know now how good I had things with WebOSs homebrew community. It took an enormous amount of work and stress to unlock my Rogers Focus so that I could enable the Internet Sharing/tethering (I should give Windows Phone another negative for the fact that I had to do thisRogers encourages tethering and the Focus HAS it built in so I can only blame Microsoft). This may get better now that Chevron is releasing a new unlocking tool and hopefully they will emulate some of what the webOS community did. With zero Linux/programming ability I had patches and homebrew apps on my Palm Pixi in no time and could add more as easily as opening the Preware App.

    Miscellaneous:
    I wont belabour this, but it is quite frustration to have to navigate into a settings app at the bottom of the long list simply to turn wifi on or off when there are indicators when you tap at the top of the screen. Those should be interactive and take you to you cell or wifi settings (or let you deal with them right there). By the way, I know you can add shortcuts to the start screen, and I do have one for wifibut that shouldnt be necessary especially given how precious the tile real-estate is.
    Another issue is that the phone-app opens to history instead of the dialpad which seems odd. Additionally, there is no search within the phone app to search for phone numbers, you are just deflected to the people hub to find contact numbers. On webos, when searching in the phone rather than in contacts, only contacts with numbers show up which can be nice when many contacts (especially Facebook) lack numbers.
    Finally, I was disappointed to realize that there is no mute switch on Windows Phones. I thought every phone had a mute switch! I dont know about android, but I webOS, backberry, and even minimalist iPhone all have physical mute switches. That is handy when you want to mute and unmute your phone on the fly or even in your pocket.


    CONCLUSION:

    There are many positives for Windows Phone as I listed above. It is fast and responsive, beautiful, and full of useful features. However, in my opinion a few of the negatives such as the way notifications are done, the limited number of tiles visible, and the lack of universal search are significant because they strike at the day-to-day usefulness of the phone. It is also unfortunate that the negatives are aspects of the very things which make Windows Phone so great (for example the UI). Nevertheless, I think Windows Phone could retain its unique beauty if it made the simple changes I mentioned (collage start-screen, Bing universal search, refining the notification/flipping properties of the tiles or adding a notification area).
    If I sound a little disappointed, I admit I am a little. But that isnt necessarily because iOS or Android are better, Im fairly sure the latter isnt and I am sure I would have frustrations with iOS. I think I am now realizing how useful the features of webOS really were. For example, I always wondered why they advertised a little thing like 'Just Type' so muchnow I know. But back to Windows Phone, although I am a little frustrated by the number of steps required to say, make a call and by the underwhelming usefulness of live-tiles, I am glad that it has sync/integration, a great virtual keyboard, lots of apps, the metro UI, and I believe it has momentum and an innovative future.
    Hey Bradley great review. Just one thing Notifications I wanted a dedicated notification screen two but I realized MS point of view when it came to notifications.

    IMO you should do this

    1. All live tiles with notification support on your main screen
    2. All static applications on your second screen you can either search or search by alphabetical characters.

    This way your main screen isn't a mess with a bunch of live and static tiles. This way you can get all your notifications right away.
  17. welsbloke's Avatar
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    #17  
    I do not agree with everything you say but you certainly put the effort in and backed up your comments which is appreicated. I glad that on the whole you are happy especially as you have lost your old friend.
  18. bradleyj's Avatar
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       #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by red grenadine View Post
    I agree that the black strip "looks" great...but I would still prefer the functionality of more space for tiles...besides, my "collage" suggestion would make it less visually boring anyway.

    But thanks for posting the explanation, it was interesting.
  19. enahs555's Avatar
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    #19  
    But if you fill the screen up completely with tiles they just become icons. Flashy icons, but still icons. By keeping a sense of style they are slightly more then flashy icons.
  20. drg
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    #20  
    I think the purpose of Live Tiles and notifications/tiles flipping with extra info is only to give you very minimal extra info e.g. there's something new/display latest update. And also it personalises your home screen e.g. with latest photos and updates from contacts pinned to your start menu. Therefore if you notice there's something you haven't seen you open the app to get the rest of the info. The purpose of live tile isn't to give you all the info you need so you don't have to open the app. I think this is much better than just static icons on iOS and apparently easier to use than widgets on Android.

    Regarding wasted real estate, I personally think it's fine the way it is and don't need to change the way it is. When you scroll through the live tiles, it's so fluid and quick that it's not a problem that only 8 are displayed in the initial screen. Scrolling thru to the rest won't disrupt the rest of your day. The size and spacing seems optimised for easy navigation, hence for example if you put your phone on a car windscreen/dashboard mount it's so so easy to navigate while even driving - not that I endorse using the phone while driving but sometimes with road noise voice command is not so effective and tapping a contacts live tile then call mobile is very easy to do, you could probably do it eyes closed.
  21. jeremyshaw's Avatar
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    #21  
    driving...eyes closed!!

    j/k, j/k :p
  22. ethylove's Avatar
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    #22  
    Very nice review. In regards to the multiple tile sizes I think it would be best if they just had a chop in half vertically so if I have 2 mailboxes, I can fit both into what would currently be just 1 mailbox. Sort of a hub in a 'tile' sense.
    Motorola T721 -> Nokia 6030 -> Blackberry 7100g -> Samsung Blackjack II SGH-i617 -> Samsung Eternity -> Nokia E71x ->Blackberry Bold 9000 -> Blackberry Bold 9700 -> Blackberry Torch 9800 <-> Samsung Focus SGH-i917 -> Dell Venue Pro -> Blackberry Torch 9810 -> Blackberry Bold 9900 -> Samsung Focus S SGH-i937 -> HTC Titan -> Nokia Lumia 900
  23. power5's Avatar
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    #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by jeremyshaw View Post
    driving...eyes closed!!

    j/k, j/k :p
    If you drove my route to work every day you would think the majority of people do exactly that.
  24. jeremyshaw's Avatar
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    #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by power5 View Post
    If you drove my route to work every day you would think the majority of people do exactly that.
    They probably were just looking down and texting :p
  25. bradleyj's Avatar
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       #25  
    Has anyone noticed that Windows 8 / 7.8 looks a lot like my collage start screen? I wonder if MS read my critique...

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